Can You Add A Bathroom To An Attic?

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You want to finish out your extra attic space, but can you add a bathroom to your attic? We’ve researched to find out the possibility and have answers for you in this post.

Adding a finished bathroom to your attic can provide additional function and value to your home. And depending upon the size of your attic, it is possible to add that bathroom. There are considerations to think about, like height, accessibility, cost, and more.

We’ll cover all of this plus show you some excellent attic renovations in this post. We’ll discuss the costs of adding a bathroom, considerations, and adding finished attic space adds to your home’s overall value. So please, keep reading.

attic bathroom corner in a minimalism style mansion with a concrete floor, grey walls, a double sink and a large bathtub. Can You Add A Bathroom To An Attic

Adding Attic Bathrooms

Our homes are living, breathing members of our family. They are where we live and love one another. They provide us a port on stormy nights, but sometimes we need to expand. If you don’t want to move to a new home and have a large enough attic, you might consider expanding up and turning your attic space into a functional space complete with a full bath or half bath.

Let’s take a look at some beautiful attic expansions to give you an idea of what can be done.

Can You Add A Bathroom To An Attic

Attics will often have sloped ceilings that leave you with less usable space than a conventional room. Here a lovely renovation has been done to create an attic bedroom and adjoining bathroom. Skylights have been installed to make up for the lack of windows (another consideration when expanding into an attic, they often don’t have windows), and lower pieces of furniture like a chest of drawers have been tucked into the slanted eave areas.

Tuck Your Tub Away In An Attic Bathroom

all white bathroom with wood accents. Tuck Your Tub Away In An Attic Bathroom

One thought when you’re designing your attic bathroom is to make use of those sloping ceilings. Here, the tub, which doesn’t require standing height like a shower, is tucked into the eave. The sink and mirror are more toward the center to allow for a full-height standing position.

Urban apartment - white bathroom at the attic with bath tub

Here’s another example of a slightly larger attic bathroom with a free-standing soaker tub in the eave space. In the right foreground of the photo, you can see that a shower is also there, but it is in a part of the attic space where there is more height to accommodate it. As you can see, it is possible to have a full bathroom if you’re smart with your positioning.

Make Your Entire Attic A Spa

Loft attic bathroom, Make Your Entire Attic A Spa

If you love nothing more than a good soak in the tub and a gorgeous view, consider this attic bathroom renovation. We are blown away by this luxury attic. A gorgeous soaker tub on a tile platform with a stand-alone tub filler is centered in the attic. Rather than skylights, actual windows have been added to the roofline. Can you say gorgeous?

Modern bathroom in attic of farm house. Make Your Entire Attic A Spa

Here’s another lovely attic spa space. An elegant soaker tub in white is surrounded by the white-painted lathe and highlighted with a simple rattan pendant light. It’s like something out of the movies.

You May Only Have Room For A Shower And Not A Tub

New clean small bathroom with shower cabin. Bathroom on attic floor with window. Room For A Shower And Not A Tub

Depending upon your space, you may only have room for a shower, and that’s just fine. It still counts as a full bathroom for resale. Here a lovely glass-walled yet compact shower stands in a taller part of the bathroom, while the toilet is tucked away below the skylight.

Bathroom in the attic. On the wall - towel radiator. Shower behind transparent partition. White toile. Room For A Shower And Not A Tub

If your attic has higher ceilings, here’s a way to tuck the shower up against the corner wall and still have plenty of room for the rest of the fixtures.

A Half Bath Is Better Than No Bath

If you don’t have the area to add a full bath or the height, a half-bath is still a solid option. It’s always nice to have an extra toilet and sink in the house. If the attic is converted to an office or a playroom, or even an art studio, it allows for a quick trip to take care of business, but a place to bathe isn’t needed.

Here the toilet is tucked up into the lower portion of the eve, and the sink and mirror are in the standing area. It’s compact, but it stills will be counted in your home’s appraisal.

Interior of a comfortable master bedroom with an en suite bathroom in the loft of a contemporary residential home. A Half Bath Is Better Than No Bath

Here’s another example of how a half bath can be tucked at the end of the attic bedroom. This cozy example uses a pedestal sink for space-saving efficiency.

How Much Does It Cost To Add A Bathroom To An Attic?

The cost of adding a bathroom to your attic can vary widely depending upon the plumbing needed and the finishes you choose. According to Home Advisor, this cost can be from as low as about $9000 to as high as $50,000. That’s a really broad range. But if you’re starting from scratch, you’re going to have to frame out the bathroom, add electricity, run plumbing and venting, and finish the walls.

Then when you move to fixtures, you’ll need to buy flooring, tile, a toilet, a sink, a vanity, a mirror, a tub or shower if it’s going to be a full bath, and any towel rods and hangers you want to add. All of these things can add up depending on what you choose. 

What To Consider For An Attic Bathroom? 

There are a variety of considerations to think about when you’re adding an attic bathroom. One is height. Most places have codes in place that say that some percentage (often at least half) of the attic space must be above 7 feet tall. You should check with your local county’s building ordinances to find out what their rule is. Next, you’ll need to know if your attic can handle the load of finished space. A full bathtub weighs a lot more than last year’s Christmas ornaments. You may need to hire an engineer to find this out.

One other significant consideration is how you get to the attic. If you’re finishing it out, the fold-down ceiling stairs aren’t going to work. You’ll need to install a staircase to access the attic space, which may or may not be possible depending upon your home’s configuration.

Does Attic Living Space Increase Home Value?

Anytime you add finished square footage to your home, it will increase the home’s value. In the case of an attic, you’re working with a roof and flooring that are already there. So that’s an advantage. On average, consumers spend about $75,000 on an attic conversion and can expect the return on investment to be between 55 and 60 percent of what they spent for the renovation.

Don’t Let Home Renovation Be Daunting

If you do your homework and check with your local zoning, a good engineer, and have a good contractor lined up, converting your attic can increase your home’s livability. It allows you to spread out under your roof without having to pack up and move. Of course, some homes may not have the right attic, and then a move might be inevitable but don’t overlook your home’s potential extra square footage.

We hope you enjoyed this post here at HomeDecorBliss. If you enjoyed this one, please check out a few others you may enjoy below:

11 Gorgeous Low Ceiling Attic Bedroom Ideas You Need To See

23 Inspiring Bathroom Decoration Ideas

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