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What Color Siding Goes With Bronze Windows?

Many homeowners prefer using bronze for their windows. In this post, we will be talking about them along with the corresponding siding colors that match. We have researched this topic in great detail and have the answers below!

Disclosure: We may get commissions for purchases made through links in this post.

Finding the siding color that matches bronze windows can be difficult. However, there are some great suggestions we have, which include:

  • Gray Siding
  • Light Brown Siding
  • Dark Bronze Siding
  • Wild Truffle Siding
  • Dark Blue Siding

Make your bronze windows look striking with these siding colors. Please continue reading below as we discuss more on matching your siding with bronze windows!

The roof of the house with nice window. - What Color Siding Goes With Bronze Windows?

Siding Colors That Go With Bronze Windows

Detail of attic of green family home on a sunny day. House has shingles and siding, with white and brown house detail.

Bronze windows break up the trend of having standard white frames. If you're planning to customize your house and thinking if you should pursue bronze windows, these siding colors are a must:

Gray Siding

A beautiful modern farmhouse with grey siding and white brick, black framed windows, and landscaping.

Gray sidings look very attractive when used in conjunction with masonry materials like red brick or bronze. It stands out with earth tones like brown or bronze, which are common among many homes—especially ancestral houses.

Gray can be paired with a wide range of other colors and complements practically any design.

Light Brown Siding

 A new suburban house with half light brown siding and have brick and stone, brown window shutters, and a front porch.

When properly coupled with specific accent colors that make a home pop, the brown siding makes an immediate strong impact.

Your facade can be painted with brown paint, brown trim, or brown siding. Try going for brown-tinted fiber cement siding for increased durability.

Dark Bronze Siding

Bronze is a classic choice for many homeowners because of its fashionable appearance and historic appeal. Of course, this can also have a modern feel if you decorate accordingly.

It is absolutely one-of-a-kind and can contribute to creating an enduring, exclusive elegance that can distinguish your home.

Industrial-inspired styles like bronze windows go well with both emerging and contemporary window designs.

Wild Truffle Siding

Wild Truffle has an undertone of chocolate brown. It is the ideal shade of paint for interior walls, window siding, and trims. It is better if it is combined with warm colors and light neutrals.

Dark Blue Siding

A new, white modern farmhouse with a dark shingled roof and black windows. The left side of the house is covered in a rock siding.

The dramatic appeal that dark blue sidings can evoke can be visually alluring. If you apply any shade of blue, the bronze accent window will significantly impact the final appearance.

What Materials Are Best For Siding?

Aside from the colors, these materials will complement your bronze windows and hold up against weather and age in your home:

Fiber Cement Board

White wood accents along roof lines and above windows with using vinyl boards triangle gable covered by horizontal vinyl siding, fascia and an attic white window frame

The most appealing feature of fiber cement sidings is their durability. Fiberboard siding does not rot or fade as wood siding does. It functions well during natural calamities and is resistant to fire and insects.

Stone Siding

Luxurious new home with curb appeal. Trendy grey two-story exterior in Bellevue with large picture windows, stone siding, covered porch and concrete pathway.

Homeowners who desire a distinctive look often choose stone siding. Stone has an unmatched aesthetic and is much more resilient than wood siding, which is fragile and can decay in the long run.

Stone siding can last longer and is made to withstand unexpected climates.

Are Bronze Windows In Style?

Bronze windows have a sophisticated appearance. It exemplifies how tradition and elegance can coexist.

Different bronze windows and doors can have distinctive and natural tone differences due to aging, making them remarkable and timeless.

During the production process, focused treatments are applied to reveal the copper-like, black, or shiny patterns on the surface of the bronze window.

How Do You Clean Bronze Windows?

Use a soft cotton cloth to lightly wipe away dust, grime, sand, and other debris from the window/door.

One tablespoon of salt and three and a half gallons of water can be used to clean non-lacquer finish materials. Don't let it dry. Clean thoroughly with fresh water.

Dry with chamois cloth or soft cotton cloth. Avoid rubbing in one area, as this may result in discoloration.

Other Bronze Windows Maintenance

Experts advise a biannual inspection and cleaning of your bronze window. You can clean your window daily by wiping it with a soft cloth.

This ensures that there won't be specks of dust on your window.

How Do You Keep Bronze From Tarnishing?

You probably don't want your bronze windows to tarnish. To prevent your windows from unexpected tarnishing, keep and maintain it by following these steps:

Neutralize The Window's Surface

Before using the protectant, you must neutralize any acid-containing cleaning products you may use, such as acid-based cleansers for metal.

This step can be skipped if you've already used a polish or cleanser without acid. The metal can be cleaned using water, EZ-Prep Cleaner, and a neutralizer.

You can substitute a water-calcium carbonate or baking soda solution if EZ-Prep is unavailable in your home. Add one cup of calcium carbonate or baking soda for every gallon of water.

You can adjust the ratios on a lesser amount if the bronze window is smaller and you don't need the entire gallon of water.

To prevent the acid from reacting with the solution in the protectant and darkening it, better to neutralize the metal and rinse it with water until it dries.

Check this Everbrite Protective Coating on Amazon.

Clean The Bronze Window's Surface 

If you're trying to preserve your bronze windows, the metal is probably already tarnished or unclean from exposure to the elements.

Before applying any protectant, you must thoroughly clean the windows' surface from all sides.

Polish the bronze memorial with a metal cleaner. You might also wish to sand the tarnished surface if it is tarnished.

Use A Solvent After Cleaning And Neutralizing

Usually, you should clean with a solvent after you have thoroughly washed and treated the bronze windows and given them ample time to dry.

Metal polishes, in particular, usually leave a residue, and you should wipe it.

All you need is a basic solvent and some soft towels. To remove polish residue, consider using xylene or denatured alcohol as a solvent and wait until it dries off.

See Sunnyside Denatured Alcohol on Amazon.

Do Bronze Windows Rust?

Naturally, bronze doesn't have an iron substance.

So when exposed to moisture, it won't rust as ferrous metals do. However, bronze is susceptible to corrosion brought on by water exposure but reacts separately compared to ferrous metals.

Bronze tarnishes to guard its surface against corrosion. The substance essentially creates a layer on its surface rather than dissolving it. This results in the internal part of bronze being unaltered.

What's The Difference Between Bronze And Brass?

Metal alloys, such as bronze and brass, are composed of two or more distinct metals. Compared to bronze, which is typically combined with other elements like phosphorous or aluminum, brass is formed of copper and zinc, while bronze is constructed primarily of copper and tin.

For thousands of years, bronze has been used for various purposes. It has always been used to make statues, coins, architectural designs, construction materials, seafaring equipment, machine parts, and technology.

Due to its exceptional corrosion resistance, bronze can be utilized on ships and other maritime seawater applications.

Similar to copper, brass has excellent anti-microbial properties. In two hours, a brass or copper surface was discovered to destroy 99.9% of bacteria. Brass is an ideal material for frequently used hardware such as door handles.

For moveable hardware components like hinges, locks, and latches, as well as for musical instruments that require a strong yet working metal with excellent resonance, brass is a top choice due to its low friction and absence of corrosion.

Benefits Of Using Bronze Windows

Due to its high resistance to the elements, bronze is excellent in any environment. It is a low-maintenance material with less potential for corrosion and exceptional seawater resistance, making it ideal for coastal regions.

Bronze is very resilient from a mechanical standpoint. It can withstand bending, traction, and shocks. Additionally, it is exceedingly resistant and can easily hold itself against the effects of erratic weather patterns.

This is the best option for architecture with minimal design, where quality and resistance are essential features to provide a long life for structures.

Since windows are the most vulnerable component of an architectural facade, they must be durable enough to lessen the need for repairs in the future.

Drawbacks Of Using Bronze Windows

Bronze materials have been around for a long time and are well-known for their elegance, toughness, and versatility.

The downside of the bronze window is only available in aluminum or wood-clad windows. Also, bronze isn't always super modern, so it's not always in newer homes.

Conclusion

Choosing the siding color for your bronze windows can be tricky; you should initially try out different color palettes to find a color that matches your taste and architectural preference.

We highly suggest you consult an expert regarding the siding color you want for your bronze windows to give you an overview of what it will look like when you establish it.

Made it to the end? Check out these helpful posts:

What Color Siding Goes With A Copper Roof?

What Color Siding Goes With A Flat Roof?