What Color Siding Goes With Weathered Wood Shingles?

Share on Facebook
Facebook
Pin on Pinterest
Pinterest
Email this to someone
email
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
We may get commissions for purchases made through links in this post.

In the early 2000s, the term shabby chic was coined by a majorly popular home improvement TV show. Though the term really kicked off 20 years ago, the truth is that weathered wood is still popular as ever to give this shabby-looking yet incredibly chic style. It’s even used in wood shingles for rustic roofing effects. But, what kind of siding works with weathered wood? We’ve found the best siding color pairings for your weather wood shingles. 

Weathered wood shingles tend to go best with siding that plays off a natural outdoorsy or cabin-y vibe. This means that there are several types of siding that you can choose that work well with weathered wood: 

  • Grey
  • Beige 
  • White
  • Brown
  • Red

Weathered wood shingles (also called wood shake) add a uniquely fairytale appeal to any home exterior, but this level of uniqueness can be difficult to work with. This guide will help ensure that you get the kind of results you need. We’ll also discuss the life expectancy of your wood shake and provide some excellent wood-on-wood pairings for your home’s exterior. 

A detailed view of a weathered wooden shingle of an old house, What Color Siding Goes With Weathered Wood Shingles?

How Do You Match Shingles To Siding?

The short answer is very carefully. The long answer is that getting a match for wooden shingles means that you need to take a look at the nuances of the shingles in question. Weathered wood shingles are usually somewhat light in color but have a strictly old-world look that makes them versatile. Let’s take a look at the best options for your home’s siding colors.

Grey

Grey siding is one of the more versatile choices you can pick, primarily because you can use both traditional siding and faux stone siding to make your home’s appearance pop. Most weathered wood shingles have grey undertones, and so grey siding ends up matching with most shingle types. It stays modern but has a very classic look. 

If your home is a Cape Cod-style front, then grey siding is usually the best choice. To get the best pairing, choose a grey that’s slightly lighter than the distressed wood shingles you want. Stone veneer siding is a good choice here, simply because it will make your home look rustic and antique…even if it’s not.

Beige

Aisnley house with gorgeous craftsman made weathered wooden shingles

Beige is the ultimate siding color for most homes, and that includes weathered wooden shingled homes. Like most other siding colors, this is a neutral color. Beige has warm undertones that make it one of the most inviting colors for siding, and since it’s light, Beige can also work with a wide range of front door color choices

This is one of the most popular siding colors to pick. It’s easy to see why. It works well with virtually any home style!

White

A two storey country home with white painted wooden shingles

White is one of the most popular siding options across the board, and it’s popular for a reason. White goes with everything, especially if you have a Colonial, Cape Cod, or Tudor home. Incidentally, all those house styles tend to favor weathered wood shingles as a roofing upgrade. Why? White and weathered wood is as traditional as can be. 

If you love the idea of giving your home a vintage air, white siding is the choice you want to choose. Besides, white houses tend to sell faster and look larger than they really are.

Brown

An old house with weathered wooden shingles on the sidings

It’s not so difficult to see why brown shingles work with distressed wood. Many (if not most) distressed shingles are primarily brown in color. When you have brown siding with brown shingles, you get a home exterior that is a dead ringer for a log cabin. This perennially-popular look is ideal for mountain chalets, farmhouse styles, ranch homes, as well as Tudor homes. 

Brown siding can be worked in a wide range of different ways, including faux stone and wood. Of course, any choice is going to work well as long as you pick the right siding for your architecture. It doesn’t get any more retro-fab than this!

Red

When we discuss having a red home, we don’t mean just any red. We mean getting siding that looks like bricks and embraces the outside of your home with that rusty-red hue. Much like brown siding, faux brick siding is a great choice for homes that have weathered wooden roofs. This combination has a stately look that is worthy of a country club. 

If you want to get a gorgeous look to your home, opting for faux brick panels is a great pick. With that said, this is best left for larger homes as a brick pattern can make petite homes look even smaller. 

What Is The Life Expectancy Of Weathered Wood Shingles?

Roofing of a house with weathered wood shingles

If you are a bit worried about getting wood shingles that are already weathered in appearance, it’s understandable. Most people associate weathered wood with pre-made damage, but this isn’t necessarily true. If you take a look at most wooden shingle companies, they’ll note that they sell shakes that are rated for 25 to 30 years. 

In theory, this means that weathered wood shingles can last up to 30 years or more. However, in practice, things are a bit different. While the ratings may be high, the truth is that you can expect weathered wooden shingles to last 15 years or so on average. This is because most rooftops will have to deal with significant UV damage as well as damage from severe weather events. 

Thankfully, it’s possible to have your wooden shake roofs live for as long as 50 years. It’s all about maintenance…

How Can You Lengthen The Lifespan Of Weathered Wooden Shingles?

If you want your roof shingles to last as long as possible, it’s important to maintain them well. This means that you need to keep your shingles properly attached to the roof, give it cleanings at least four times a year, and treat any signs of rotting that you notice as soon as you notice them. 

Prevention is the biggest predictor of wooden shingle lifespans. To make the most out of your preventative measures, you will need to apply (and re-apply) a protective wood stain every five years. This may be time-consuming and labor-intensive, but it’s the only way to ensure that you will keep your wooden shingles for 50 years or more.

What Wood Tones Go Together?

If you’re going to involve wood in your siding, it’s important to make sure that you match your siding wood to the wood of your shingles. This can be tricky since distressed wood can be fickle to match. Thankfully, matching your wood tones is pretty simple. 

  • Blue and grey undertones match together well. So if you have blue-toned stains, like ash with a maple stain, or ash with a cool undertone, those will work well together.
  • Match golden wood tones with one another. Oak and soft maple are a classic combination of this pairing.
  • Red tones also work well together. Cherry finishes, for example, will pair well with sienna stains.

Are Weathered Wood Shingles Popular?

Like with all other exterior options, there will be people who like this look as well as people who don’t. If you are the proud owner of a mountain home, a farmhouse, a ranch home, or a beach house, weathered shake roofs make all the sense in the world. In fact, the right architecture can turn a shake roof into a major selling point. It just fits the scenery’s ambiance!

Conclusion

Getting the best siding for your roof isn’t always easy, especially when it comes to wooden shingles. If you want to have a shake roof, the best way to make sure that you get the best outcome is to opt for lightly colored sidings such as grey, beige, or white. Of course, opting for a traditional faux stone or brick veneer can also work in a pinch too. 

Regardless of what siding you choose, it’s always best to double-check the siding color against the wood shake of your roof. Most companies have swatches that you can take to compare, so don’t be afraid to ask for a swatch sample. When in doubt, stick to beige or white. It’s hard to go wrong with those classic colors. 

Share on Facebook
Facebook
Pin on Pinterest
Pinterest
Email this to someone
email
Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
We may get commissions for purchases made through links in this post.

This Post Has One Comment

  1. Pam

    Painting outside of house Sherwin Williams Natural Linen, Front Door Sherwin Williams Soar, with Sherwin Williams extra white for trim. Hoping weathered wood color shingles will go. The other color we picked was not available.

Leave a Reply